Kliping Berita

Is the true spirit of Kartini alive today?

Putu Geniki L.Natih, Jakarta | Wed, 04/21/2010 9:57 AM | Opinion

April 21, the birthday of Raden Ayu Kartini is here again. And while it is important that today’s youth remember Kartini’s key role in breaking down resistance to women’s education, what is perhaps more important is to remember this Indonesian hero in the context of millennium development goals related to poverty alleviation, education, fraternal death rates and gender issues related to human rights.

Where do we stand now? What programs have been made in Indonesia? Kartini went beyond the norms of her society and although she didn’t live to see the first Kartini schools open in 1916, her courageous and pioneering spirit lived on, making co-education possible.
If we consider current gender issues in Indonesia, we can find that very same pioneering and courageous work is being done this very minute.
Siti Musdah Mulia, who in 2007 was honored with the International “Women of Courage Award”, has long been a source of inspiration for me.
The award she received recognizes women around the globe who have shown exceptional leadership in promoting women’s rights and advancement.
A prolific writer, Mulia’s publications have been translated into more than 300 Indonesian local languages in order to reach women as far afield as Indonesia’s various island communities.
Just as Kartini sought to make women literate, Mulia’s work today shows women the freedom and choices that literacy can bestow.
During the recent HPAIR Conference that I attended at Harvard University, one of the plenary sessions discussed gender issues, with specific reference to the status and rights of migrant workers, particularly female migrant workers from Indonesia.
Sadly, the films we watched gave details of how unscrupulous middlemen entice poverty stricken women to “work” overseas.
Unprotected, they are cheated out of their salaries and physically abused.
Such abuse of the poor, besides physical and verbal abuse, whether domestic or public, is never to be tolerated.
These are the real crimes that must be eliminated not only from Indonesia’s diverse communities but from every nation on earth through education and protective laws set and firmly implemented by local, national and international bodies. Only then can we have a peaceful nation and in turn a peaceful planet.
Returning to Indonesia following the conference mentioned above, I flew via Doha and after a long
stopover, boarded the eight-hour flight to Jakarta. The plane was packed with returning migrant workers.
They were the lucky ones who had not been cheated out of their money and could return to Indonesia, but my tears fell just the same as I heard of young women, my fellow Indonesians, the victims of unbearably harsh working conditions overseas, offer up prayers of relief and thankfulness as our plane at last flew over Indonesian territory.
I will never forget those whispered words, “Indonesia tanah airku”, Indonesia my beloved homeland.
The hope brought to such women by the unceasing efforts of Ibu Siti Musdah Mulia, shows that Kartini is not just a memory, but an inspiration.
Kartini went beyond the societal norms and although she didn’t live to see the first schools open in 1916, her courageous spirit lived on.
The writer is a student at the Faculty of Economics, University of Indonesia and a delegate for the HPAIR 2010 Harvard Conference at Harvard Universit

April 21, the birthday of Raden Ayu Kartini is here again. And while it is important that today’s youth remember Kartini’s key role in breaking down resistance to women’s education, what is perhaps more important is to remember this Indonesian hero in the context of millennium development goals related to poverty alleviation, education, fraternal death rates and gender issues related to human rights.

Where do we stand now? What programs have been made in Indonesia? Kartini went beyond the norms of her society and although she didn’t live to see the first Kartini schools open in 1916, her courageous and pioneering spirit lived on, making co-education possible.

If we consider current gender issues in Indonesia, we can find that very same pioneering and courageous work is being done this very minute.

Siti Musdah Mulia, who in 2007 was honored with the International “Women of Courage Award”, has long been a source of inspiration for me.

The award she received recognizes women around the globe who have shown exceptional leadership in promoting women’s rights and advancement.

A prolific writer, Mulia’s publications have been translated into more than 300 Indonesian local languages in order to reach women as far afield as Indonesia’s various island communities.

Just as Kartini sought to make women literate, Mulia’s work today shows women the freedom and choices that literacy can bestow.

During the recent HPAIR Conference that I attended at Harvard University, one of the plenary sessions discussed gender issues, with specific reference to the status and rights of migrant workers, particularly female migrant workers from Indonesia.

Sadly, the films we watched gave details of how unscrupulous middlemen entice poverty stricken women to “work” overseas.

Unprotected, they are cheated out of their salaries and physically abused.

Such abuse of the poor, besides physical and verbal abuse, whether domestic or public, is never to be tolerated.

These are the real crimes that must be eliminated not only from Indonesia’s diverse communities but from every nation on earth through education and protective laws set and firmly implemented by local, national and international bodies. Only then can we have a peaceful nation and in turn a peaceful planet.

Returning to Indonesia following the conference mentioned above, I flew via Doha and after a long stopover, boarded the eight-hour flight to Jakarta. The plane was packed with returning migrant workers.

They were the lucky ones who had not been cheated out of their money and could return to Indonesia, but my tears fell just the same as I heard of young women, my fellow Indonesians, the victims of unbearably harsh working conditions overseas, offer up prayers of relief and thankfulness as our plane at last flew over Indonesian territory.

I will never forget those whispered words, “Indonesia tanah airku”, Indonesia my beloved homeland.

The hope brought to such women by the unceasing efforts of Ibu Siti Musdah Mulia, shows that Kartini is not just a memory, but an inspiration.

Kartini went beyond the societal norms and although she didn’t live to see the first schools open in 1916, her courageous spirit lived on.

The writer is a student at the Faculty of Economics, University of Indonesia and a delegate for the HPAIR 2010 Harvard Conference at Harvard University.

Show More

Related Articles

One Comment

  1. After reading your blog post I browsed your website a bit and noticed you aren’t ranking nearly as well in Google as you could be. I possess a handful of blogs myself and I think you should take a look here: http://articlemarketingrobots.org You’ll find it’s a very nice tool that can bring you a lot more visitors. Keep up the quality posts

Tinggalkan Balasan

Alamat email Anda tidak akan dipublikasikan. Ruas yang wajib ditandai *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Close